Former gang member appointed to Denver's crime prevention commission

Goals of unit include reducing crime, expanding alternatives to jail

Staff report
Posted 5/7/18

A former gang member and Denver native has been appointed by Mayor Michael Hancock to serve on Denver’s Crime Prevention and Control Commission.

Leo Alirez, from the Denver Inner City Parish, …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Former gang member appointed to Denver's crime prevention commission

Goals of unit include reducing crime, expanding alternatives to jail

Posted

A former gang member and Denver native has been appointed by Mayor Michael Hancock to serve on Denver’s Crime Prevention and Control Commission.

Leo Alirez, from the Denver Inner City Parish, has extensive experience leading intervention, prevention and re-entry programs out of the parish.

“It is an incredible privilege to serve on this commission,” Alirez said in a news release from Inner City Parish.

“I grew up in a gang and saw firsthand the allure, but also the hardship that comes with that life. For the last 14 years I’ve been working to prevent criminal behavior and intervene when violence erupts. I’m excited to be able to offer my expertise on such an important commission.”

Alirez’s experience, combined with his degree in addictions and honorary doctorate in human services, make him a prime candidate for the commission, which aims to reduce crime and recidivism, develop related evidence-based programs within the justice system, and expand appropriate alternatives to jail, among other goals, the release says.

Alirez has worked for more than a decade with Colorado judicial systems and nonprofits to help empower former gang members to successfully reintegrate back into their families and communities.

He is certified through the National Gang Crime Research Center and also is a certified addictions counselor.
In 2017, Alrez was selected by Hancock as an honoree of the My Brother’s Keeper Initiative of Denver, a nationwide initiative that works to “make the American dream available to all boys and young men of color by eliminating gaps in their opportunities and outcomes.”

He oversees the Life, Evolving Fathers and Recreation programs at the parish’s College View Community Center in southwest Denver.

Denver Inner City Parish is a grassroots, community-based human services nonprofit that has been welcoming and empowering people in need through support, determination, and community since 1960.
For information, go online to www.dicp.org.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.