Work on 63-home Habitat project progresses

olunteers, including local residents, have completed 53 of the units

Posted 7/31/18

The buzz of power saws and the rap-rap-rap of hammers filled the air July 25 as crews continued work on the Sheridan Square Habitat for Humanity project. Robyn Burns, director of Denver Habitat …

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Work on 63-home Habitat project progresses

olunteers, including local residents, have completed 53 of the units

Posted

The buzz of power saws and the rap-rap-rap of hammers filled the air July 25 as crews continued work on the Sheridan Square Habitat for Humanity project.

Robyn Burns, director of Denver Habitat marketing and communications, said Sheridan Square is the largest single project in Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver history. The development is located southeast of West Kenyon Avenue and South Knox Court.

“The project will include 63 Habitat homes,” she said. “Fifty-three units have been completed and about half the completed homes are occupied. Construction on the project began two years ago and we expect to complete the project by the end of next year.”

Habitat for Humanity builds homes in the United States and 70 foreign countries. The website states the vision of Habitat for Humanity is a world where everyone has a decent place to live.

Burns said July 25 was part of Women Work Week for Habitat and about 200 women were expected to undertake the task to blitz-frame at least two homes during the week.

“Anyone who wants to volunteer can help and no construction skills are required,” she said. “We have individual volunteers sign up to help as well as companies that let employees help us build homes for those in need.”

On July 25, about 10 employees of Wells Fargo were among the volunteers working on the home that will be part of Sheridan Square.

Littleton resident Cara Hyndman was one of the Wells Fargo employees working on the project.

“This is the second time I have worked on a Habitat for Humanity project. Our employer gives us a few days a year to do volunteer work so I chose to work on this project,” she said. “I think working on a Habitat project is a lot of fun. I am getting pretty good with a hammer and today I got to work with power tools for the first time.”

She said she likes the opportunity to give back to the community.

“It is super fun today to be out here with all these ladies who are helping build homes that will help more families have a decent place to live,” she said.

“I also think it is great special to be working with a crew of all women. I think it is empowering to see what we women can do to build a home for a needy family.”

Habitat for Humanity Metro Denver was founded in 1979. Burns said since it was founded it has assisted 840 families.

“About 600 of those families moved into new homes,” she said. “Habitat volunteers helped renovate, rebuild or modernize the homes of the other families.”

A family applies to be part of Habitat online. Burns said the applications are evaluated and prioritized based on if the family is living in substandard housing, if they are paying more than 30 percent of their income for housing, and the ability to fulfill requirements of the program, including ability to pay the mortgage and willingness to put in 200 hours of “sweat equity” working on their homes or the homes of other habitat families.

Once a family is accepted to become residents of a Habitat home they are sent a list of the properties under construction. When they select a site for their home, they are required to put in the “sweat equity” that is part of their agreement.

As the home is being built, the family attends 11 to 15 hours of classes about what is expected of homeowners, such as maintaining the property and the home.

“The families sign a 30-year mortgage agreement.” Burns said. “The payment is never more than 30 percent of their income and the mortgage is at below market rate. Every effort is made to help the family successfully purchase their new home. We feel it is working because Habitat has a less than 2 percent foreclosure rate.”

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