Wild West meets street fair

Bailey Day provides fun activites for all ages

Deb Hurley Brobst
dbrobst@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 6/20/21

What do food, booths, music, the Wild West and kids activities have in common? Bailey Day, of course. Hundreds walked along Main Street, perusing the booths, trying some of the array of food and …

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Wild West meets street fair

Bailey Day provides fun activites for all ages

Posted

What do food, booths, music, the Wild West and kids activities have in common? Bailey Day, of course.

Hundreds walked along Main Street, perusing the booths, trying some of the array of food and drinks, and listening to music from two stages. There was a lot for all ages to see and do at the annual street festival.

Indy & Olly's, a nonprofit based in Evergreen, was one of more than 100 booths at Bailey Day, offering dog bandanas for sale. For every bandana sold, the nonprofit donates one to a dog rescue organization, hoping that the bandanas will improve adoption photos.

According to Debbie Wright, the organization is named after two rescue dogs she had, and each bandana has two tiny hearts in it, one to commemorate each.

The Park County Regulators, an Old West reenactment team based in Bailey, are always a hit at Bailey Day. They performed skits, gunfight reenactments, weapons demonstrations and more — while wearing authentic mid-1880s garb. Their goal is to ensure a historically accurate experience.

The actors walked through the crowds along Main Street to the delight of attendees.

Diamond Lil, aka Jeannyne McMillen of Littleton, brought her horses to add to the Old West ambience, noting that it was nice for the actors to be among the crowd doing what they love.

Snake, aka Carl Solko of Bailey, was glad life was returning to normal, adding that the group found out last week that it also would perform at the Georgetown Loop Railroad in August.

For Devlin Foster, 12, the archery range next to the Bailey Community Center was the best part.

“There's nothing better than this,” he said after taking a turn with a bow and arrow.

His mom, Becca Miner, who was born and raised in Bailey, said Devlin has an archery kit at home, so their first stop at Bailey Day was the archery range.

Another big hit with the kids was The Denver Balloon Guy, who created elaborate balloon sculptures for children — a horse, a wearable car and more. Children waited for balloon-master Jeremy Briggs to create the one-of-a-kind creations, each getting Briggs' undivided attention as he twisted the balloons into various shapes.

Six-year-old Rue Calhoun of Pine watched as Briggs made a purple unicorn, saying she loved Bailey Day, especially the bouncy houses and the cool balloons.

Cynde and Richard George watched Rue enjoying the balloon-creation session, noting that the three of them had been to previous Bailey Day celebrations.

“We came from Chicago where all fairs were huge,” Richard George said. “We love small-town fairs.”

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